Home Latest News Low-and-middle income countries lead in integrating air quality into climate commitments, shows analysis – Times of India

Low-and-middle income countries lead in integrating air quality into climate commitments, shows analysis – Times of India

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Low-and-middle income countries lead in integrating air quality into climate commitments, shows analysis – Times of India

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NEW DELHI: Low-and-middle-income countries are leading in integrating air quality into their nationally-determined contributions (NDCs) — national plans to achieve the Paris Agreement goals — which include limiting global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius, according to a recent analysis. The Global Climate and Health Alliance (GCHA), a global consortium of health organisations, has assessed the connection between climate action and clean air, with a focus on NDCs.
Its “Clean Air NDC Scorecard” reveals which countries recognise the links between climate action and clean air and which have missed the opportunity for ambitious climate action and the associated health benefits.
Among the 170 NDCs analysed, 14 of the 15 top-scoring countries are low-or middle-income nations.
The 15 top-scoring countries are — Colombia, Mali, Ivory Coast, Nigeria, Pakistan, Togo, Ghana, Albania, Bangladesh, Cambodia, El Salvador, Honduras, Moldova, Sierra Leone and Chile.
Several African countries have performed well, with Mali, Ivory Coast, Nigeria, Togo and Ghana scoring 9 out of 15 or above.
In contrast, high-income countries such as Bahrain, Nauru, North Korea, Palau, Saudi Arabia and the Solomon Islands scored lower, the analysis showed.
Only 32 NDCs make reference to forward-looking targets, monitoring or projections, revealing room for improvement, it said.
While 164 NDCs mention air quality to some extent and 119 consider specific health-harming air pollutants, many countries are yet to take sufficient action to prevent air pollution-related mortality, according to the analysis.
The GCAH emphasises that mitigation or emission reduction is crucial to prevent adverse health impacts and mitigate health “losses and damages”.
The report also underscores the urgent need for financial support to enable the countries recognising the benefits of integrated efforts on clean air, climate and health to take action.
The right to health is acknowledged in the Paris Agreement and the connection between health and climate change is expected to receive increased emphasis at this year’s UN climate talks (COP28) in Dubai.
The Global Stocktake, a two-year review of global efforts to achieve the Paris Agreement goals, is anticipated to consider the health co-benefits of mitigation actions and help shape the next round of NDCs.
“It is very important to link the global climate change and local air pollution sources. Both originate from fossil fuel consumption and by outrightly linking the two in all national and international policies and commitments, the action on phasing out fossil fuel can accelerate further,” Sunil Dahiya, an analyst at the Centre for Research on Energy and Clean Air, said.



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